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Guide Free Woman: The Life and Times of Victoria Woodhull

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An unrelated man in Texas admitted to voting for her, saying he was casting his vote against Grant. Woodhull again tried to gain nominations for the presidency in and Newspapers reported that her attempt culminated in her nomination by the "National Woman Suffragists' Nominating Convention" on September Marietta L. Stow of California was nominated as the candidate for vice president. Parker was its president. Some woman's suffrage organizations repudiated the nominations, however, claiming that the nominating committee was unauthorized.

Woodhull was quoted as saying that she was "destined" by "prophecy" to be elected president of the United States in the upcoming election. In October , Woodhull divorced her second husband, Colonel Blood.

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The sisters accepted the offer and moved to Great Britain in August She made her first public appearance as a lecturer at St. James's Hall in London on December 4, Present at one of her lectures was the banker John Biddulph Martin. They began to see each other and married on October 31, His family disapproved of the union but eventually gave in. From then on, she was known as Victoria Woodhull Martin. Under that name, she published the magazine The Humanitarian from to with help from her daughter, Zula Woodhull.

After her husband died in , Martin gave up publishing and retired to the country, establishing residence at Bredon's Norton , where she built a village school with Tennessee and Zula. Through her work at the Bredon's Norton school, she became a champion for education reform in English village schools with the addition of kindergarten curriculum.

Her opposition to abortion is frequently cited by opponents of abortion when writing about first wave feminism. Every woman knows that if she were free, she would never bear an unwished-for child, nor think of murdering one before its birth. Who proposes to disturb Madame Restel? Who really wants that there should be no opportunity to secure an abortion under peculiarly trying circumstances? She put much of the blame on society for the reason women had abortions, especially wealthy married women.

They have become unfit to have children, and abortion is the sewerage for this wretched stagnation of feminine life [61]. Woodhull also promoted eugenics , which was popular in the early 20th century prior to World War II.

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It tied into her views on abortion, as she blamed abortion for assorted problems with pregnancies. She advocated, among other things, sex education, "marrying well," and pre-natal care as a way to bear healthier children and to prevent mental and physical disease. Her writings demonstrate views closer to those of the anarchist eugenists, rather than the coercive eugenists like Sir Francis Galton. In , publisher Michael W. Perry discovered, and published in his book "Lady Eugenist", that Woodhull supported the forcible sterilization of those she considered unfit to breed.

He cited a New York Times article from in which she concurred with the ruling of the case Buck v. This was a stark contrast to her earlier works in which she advocated social freedom and opposed government interference in matters of love and marriage. A cenotaph of Victoria Woodhull is located at Tewkesbury Abbey. A likeness of Victoria made out of linden wood appears on the hours.

The Broadway musical Onward Victoria was inspired by Woodhull's life. The Woodhull Sexual Freedom Alliance is an American human rights and sexual freedom advocacy organization, founded in , and named in honor of Victoria Woodhull. She was honored by the Office of the Manhattan Borough President in March and was included in a map of historical sites related or dedicated to important women. On September 26, , she posthumously received the "Ronald H.

Brown Trailblazer Award" from the St. Mary L. James H. Blood, accepted the award on Victoria Woodhull's behalf. Trailblazer Awards are presented "to individuals whose work and activities in the business and community demonstrate a commitment to uplifting under-represented groups and individuals.

FREE WOMAN: The Life and Times of Victoria Woodhull by Marion Meade | Kirkus Reviews

Victoria Bond composed the opera Mrs. President about Woodhull. In March , Amazon Studios announced production of a movie based on her life, produced by and starring Brie Larson as Victoria Woodhull. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. American leader of the women's suffrage movement.

James Blood m. John Biddulph Martin m. Main article: United States presidential election, List of civil rights leaders List of suffragists and suffragettes List of women's rights activists Ezra Heywood Swami Laura Horos Onward Victoria Timeline of women's rights other than voting Timeline of women's suffrage International Workingmen's Association in America. June 17, Retrieved November 9, The Pantagraph. Retrieved April 13, The Attic. Retrieved July 9, Toronto Star , October 22, Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton , had begun publication two years earlier in Claflin and Col.

Y], November 3, 1. Other Powers. Alfred A. Retrieved September 12, New York: Press of William Green. Biography of Victoria C.


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Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. Retrieved June 9, Penguin Books. Who's Who. NYU, , pp. Bedford; St. A speech on the principles of social freedom, delivered in Steinway hall, Nov.


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Woodhull, pub. A Review of the Evidence. Victoria Woodhull's work". December Retrieved May 17, The Gilded Age. Newbury: New Word City, Inc. Studies in Rhetorics and Feminisms. Southern Illinois University Press.

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Free Woman: The Life and Times of Victoria Woodhull

University of Pennsylvania Press, Incorporated. Retrieved July 5, Retrieved April 30, Retrieved December 19, Rereading Sex. New York: Random House, To the Hon. Most respectfully submitted. Victoria C. Woodhull, First Woman to Run for President". Accessed May 28, Retrieved August 5, They are Charged with Publishing an Obscene Newspaper". New York Times. November 3, Retrieved June 27, The agent of the Society for the Suppression of Obscene Literature, yesterday morning, appeared before United States Commissioner Osborn and asked for a warrant for the arrest of Mrs.

Woodhull and Miss Tennie Retrieved January 2, Victoria Woodhull: Fearless Feminist. Trailblazer biography.

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Republican Warren G. Harding was elected. After a seven decades-long battle for the vote, who remembered, for instance, the historic election of — won by the incumbent Ulysses S. Grant—an election noteworthy because another of the candidates that year was a woman. Not that people had taken Victoria Woodhull seriously at the time.

I am too many years ahead of this age, observed Woodhull, and that is exactly right. As there was no place for her in the 19th century she was soon forgotten. But in the s, when another generation of feminists was banding together to fight for their civil rights, her accomplishments seemed worth celebrating. Was the time ripe for a comeback, I wondered?

Victoria Claflin Woodhull was an intense, statuesque beauty, one of ten children born to a poor family in Homer, Ohio. After only a few years of schooling she married at fifteen and had two children with a husband who turned out to be an alcoholic. And yet, astonishingly, just a dozen years later she and her sister Tennessee rolled into New York City and proceeded to make a name for themselves in the business world.

For years, feminists had struggled to win equal rights. Along came Woodhull, aglow with confidence. What set the outsider apart from other activists was a combination of brains, beauty, and brass. The power players at the time were Susan B.